fbpx
DONATE NOW
Symposium on Antisemitism 2018-10-09T13:03:34+00:00
Symposium Program

 

Alvin Rosenfeld

Alvin H. Rosenfeld, Professor of English and Jewish Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, received his Ph.D. from Brown University in 1967 and has taught at Indiana University since 1968. He holds the Irving M. Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies and is Director of the university’s Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism. He founded Indiana University’s well-regarded Borns Jewish Studies Program and served as its director for 30 years. He has been honored with Indiana University Distinguished Service Award and also the Provost’s Medal “in recognition of sustained academic excellence, vision, and leadership resulting in lasting and widespread impact.”

The editor of William Blake:  Essays (1969) and the Collected Poetry of John Wheelwright (1972), he is also the author of numerous scholarly and critical articles on American poetry, Jewish writers, and the literature of the Holocaust.  Indiana University Press published his Confronting the Holocaust: The Impact of Elie Wiesel (co-edited with Irving Greenberg) in 1979 and, in 1980, published his A Double Dying:  Reflections on Holocaust Literature (the book has since appeared in German, Polish, and Hungarian translations).  With his wife, Erna Rosenfeld, he translated Gunther Schwarberg’s The Murders at Bullenhuser Damm, a book on Nazi medical atrocities published by the Indiana University Press in 1984.  His Imagining Hitler was published by Indiana University Press in 1985 (available also in a Japanese translation).  He edited Thinking About the Holocaust: After Half a Century (Indiana University Press, 1997), a collection of articles by 13 scholars, which includes his essay, “The Americanization of the Holocaust.”  His The Writer Uprooted: Contemporary Jewish Exile Literature appeared with Indiana University Press in 2009. His most recent study of Holocaust literature and memory, The End of the Holocaust, was published in April, 2011 with Indiana University Press. The book has been published in German, Hebrew, Hungarian, and Polish translations. In recent years, he has been writing about contemporary antisemitism, and some of his articles on this subject have evoked intense debate. Resurgent Antisemitism: Global Perspectives, an edited volume, appeared in spring, 2013. Deciphering the New Antisemitism was published in 2015. Anti-Zionism, Antisemitism, and the Dynamics of Delegitimization is to appear in 2018. He is also editor of a series of books on Jewish Literature and Culture published by Indiana University Press as well as editor of IUP’s new book series, “Studies in Antisemitism.”

Professor Rosenfeld has served as an editorial board member of various scholarly journals, including Holocaust and Genocide Studies and Antisemitism Studies. He has also been a board member and scholarly consultant to various national and international institutions and organizations, including the Anti-Defamation League, the American Jewish Committee, the Lilly Endowment, the Wexner Heritage Foundation, the Koret Foundation, and the Conference on Material Claims against Germany. He held a 5-year Presidential appointment on the United States Holocaust Memorial Council (2002-2007) and also served on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Executive Committee. For 10 years he was Chair of the Academic Committee of the Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies and continues as a member of that committee as well as a member of the Museum’s Committee on Holocaust Denial and Antisemitism.

Professor Rosenfeld is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and the recipient of fellowship grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Foundation of Jewish Culture, and the National Endowment of the Humanities.

Professor Rosenfeld was awarded the Doctor of Humane Letters degree, honoris causa, by Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, in May, 2007.

He has lectured widely in America, Europe, and Israel. In recent years, he has been an invited speaker on the topic of today’s antisemitism at the German Bundestag, in Berlin, the British House of Lords, in London, the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa, the Institute for National Security Studies in Tel Aviv, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and many other places.

 

Günther Jikeli

Günther JikeliGünther Jikeli is on an extended appointment at Indiana University as a Visiting Associate Professor and Justin M. Druck Family Scholar in the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism, Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program, since Fall 2015.

Jikeli received his doctorate from the Center for Research on Antisemitism at Technical University Berlin in 2011. He is a historian and sociologist of modern Europe, with particular interests in the history of antisemitism.

Jikeli was the editor of a previous book (2014) on forced labor at Peenemunde from 1936 to 1945 for the construction of the V-2 Rocket under technical director Wernher von Braun. The book underlines the irrationality of this endeavor, which led to immense suffering.

His book Perceptions of the Holocaust in Europe and Muslim Communities: Sources, Comparisons and Educational Challenges (with Joëlle Allouche-Benayoun, 2013) is a collection of studies of today’s often problematic views of the Holocaust, focusing on Western Europe.

His current research projects include works on the impact of contemporary antisemitism in France and Germany, Dieudonné, intergenerational transmissions of antisemitic beliefs, and perceptions of the Holocaust.

Dr. Jikeli offers supervision and advice for students who wish to study antisemitism or who are writing a thesis related to antisemitism. Different methods and approaches of critical antisemitism studies will be discussed.

Mark Roseman

Mark RosemanMark Roseman is a historian of modern Europe, with particular interests in the History of the Holocaust and in modern German history. Mr. Roseman publications have covered a wide range of topics in German, European and Jewish history, including life-reform and protest in 1920s and 1930s Germany; Holocaust survival and memory; Nazi policy and perpetrators; the social impact of total war; post-1945 German and European reconstruction; generation conflict and youth rebellion; Jewish and other minorities in modern German history. He also has an interest in the comparative history of genocide. My current research projects include rethinking the meaning and role of race und Nazi rule, German Jewish experience of Nazi persecution, a history of resistance and rescue und Nazi rule, and a critical synthesis of recent work on Nazi perpetrators.

Jeremy Price

Jeremy Price is Assistant Professor of Technology, Innovation, and Pedagogy in the Indiana University School of Education-Indianapolis at IUPUI, as well as the President of the IUPUI Jewish Faculty and Staff Council and the Faculty Advisor for the Jewish Student Association. Dr. Price’s research and teaching focus on supporting the development of purposeful practices based in critical reflection with technology to support good and just teaching by preservice and inservice teachers. This has led him to investigate teaching practices grounded in reflection and social justice through multiple lenses, such as social network theory, communities of practice, and mindful and contemplative practices. In addition, he explores the ways that technology can be used to give marginalized students a voice and a platform for exploring the intersection of place, environment and community. Prior to taking the position at IUPUI, Dr. Price has been involved in teacher education and technology-based curriculum design, research, and evaluation in a range of places and settings, including West Virginia, the San Francisco Bay area, metropolitan Boston, and Los Angeles. Dr. Price received his doctoral degree in Curriculum and Instruction from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, his masters degree in Technology in Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and his bachelors degree in Cultural Anthropology with a minor in Jewish Thought from Brandeis University.

Lindsey Mintz
Lindsey Mintz Bio PhotoLindsey Mintz has been the Executive Director of the Indianapolis Jewish Community Relations Council since 2012, and served as the JCRC’s Government Affairs Director from 2002 to 2007. Established in 1942 as the public affairs and community relations arm of the organized Jewish community, the Indy JCRC builds consensus on public affairs issues within the Jewish community, and translates these positions into community action and partnerships with civic leaders, elected officials, and faith & ethnic communities, acting in coalition with other groups advocating human & civil rights and social & economic justice.

Lindsey currently serves on the Steering Committee of the City of Indianapolis’ Race & Cultural Relations Leadership Network. On the Board of Directors of the Kennedy King Memorial Initiative, and is a past Board Chair of the Center for Interfaith Cooperation. Lindsey is a member of the inaugural class (2006) of the Hoosier Fellows Leadership Program, which is an initiative of IU’s Randall Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence.

Lindsey is a graduate of the Borns Jewish Studies Program from IU Bloomington (1998), where she focused on Jewish history and art history. She completed a Master’s in Public History from IUPUI (2005), having written her Master’s thesis on the history of Jewish education in Indianapolis.

Lindsey is a 3rd generation Jewish Hoosier, born and raised in South Bend, Indiana. Her first trip to Israel consisted of a month-long stay on a kibbutz with her family when she was 9 years old; that was the first of well over a dozen trips to Israel, including as a March of the Living participant (1994), a year attending the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (1996), and a summer studying Hebrew in the North (2000).

Anti-defamation League

ADL is a leading anti-hate organization. Founded in 1913 in response to an escalating climate of anti-Semitism and bigotry, its timeless mission is to protect the Jewish people and to secure justice and fair treatment for all. Today, ADL continues to fight all forms of hate with the same vigor and passion. ADL is the first call when acts of anti-Semitism occur. A global leader in exposing extremism, delivering anti-bias education, and fighting hate online, ADL’s ultimate goal is a world in which no group or individual suffers from bias, discrimination or hate. ADL’s Midwest Region covers Northern Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North and South Dakota.